6 years after serving as teen allied bomber command burma, norman macrae met von neumann while sceonded to NY by te economist. Von neumann said will you teach journalists world's ,ost valuable question: what goods will peoples do with 100 times more tech every decade 1030s to 2020s; aftre 40 years at The Economits dad and my book's readers 2025 report voted for edtutech as sustainability's best chnace- so in new york of 2022 whose alumni for edutech good can make younger half of world the sustainability generation not the extinction generation? your nominations are welcome chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk

Sunday, July 31, 2022

remembering stiries of norman and neumann

.OXFORD UNION DEBATE

Growth depends on never letting politicians spend more than one quarter of GDP, May 1996

For the Motion: Mr Norman Macrae (aka The Economist's Unacknowledged Giant) : references 1

"Mr President, Sir,

On the night I was conceived in 1922, by a then junior British diplomat in New York, the lucky Americans similarly enjoying themselves around him had only 8% of their GPs spent by politicians. So Americans in that decade brought the world's cleanest environment revolution, as they triumphed over that pollutant vehicle the horse, put mankind on motor cars' wheels, and built sudden industrial strength which alone meant that Hitler, who by my 18th Christmas in 1941 held Europe from Atlantic to 20 miles from Moscow, was not quite strong enough to shove into gas ovens tiresomely argumentative people like me - and it would later, sir, have been you and all those so happily arguing still in this House.

After the war, we dinosaurs doddered. As I think the second oldest speaker tonight, I am properly desolate, sir, that we hand on to you of my granddaughters' generation an advanced world, at present divided into what comprehensive schoolteachers would call three halves.

In the 15 countries of our west European home, politicians spend between 42% and 63% of our GDPs, in deadening ways so job-losing and so sclerotic that - has old Oxford not noticed this, or does its brain hurt? - unemployment, especially for those whose European youth has been less gilded than yours, rises at each comparable stage of each successive trade cycle, and must thus continue until you see why.

Growth depends on never letting politicians spend more than one quarter of GDP

Oxford Union Debate of 30 May 1996



For the motion : Norman Macrae (CBE and Japanese Order of the Rising Sun), economist, market futurologist, writer of over 2000 editorials, mainly retired after 5 decades of journalism at The Economist and The Sunday Times

Against the motion: Rt Honourable Michael Foot, UK Member of Parliament for Plymouth (1945-1955), Ebbw Vale (1960-1983), Leader of the Labour Party (1980-1983) and succeeded by Rt Hon Neil Kinnock (1983-1992

Politicians' spend of GDP dwindles to "only" 35% in Europe's next two clear competitor countries. In America and in Japan which I briefly economically advised 35 years ago when its real GDP at yen exchange rate was one eighth of what it is now. The surge after 1950 by Hiroshimaed Japan in (eg) life expectancy (49 years for a Japanese in 1950, way over our 79 for its old ladies now) - plus its leapfrog beyond us in living standards, in education for its humblest inter-city children circa six times better than ours, in lower crime - was to us who tended it then by far the most exciting sudden forward leap in all the economic history of the world. Do note that it started, and had its main impetus, when its politicians spent only 24% of its GDP. In both Japan and America state spending has been subjected to an upward creep - a good soubriquet, that, for Clinton and Blair and Hashimoto - but since politicians' GDP pinch is still curbed to only 35%, both still exceed Europe in faster innovation and thus fuller employment.


The 1950s-1960s role of Japan is now carried forward by the third group of competitors poised to pinch our patrimony. The Hong Kongs and Singapores, which were coolie countries when I first saw them, have duly passed Britain in living standards, in inner city non-yobdom, in far better education than ours for the mass of their 17 year olds - even though, no sir, because their politicians spend, by IMF valuation, only 18% of their GDPs.

Has the penny really not dropped among Oxford's dreaming spires? When technology surges forward as in this computer age, the new wealth of nations springs from three main manifestations of human wit. One, a relentless daily search among a million competing profit centres on how best next to improve use of that technology next morning. Second, maximum competition in forecasting and guessing and experimenting with what the future may bring. Never allow politicians' monopoly in that. Third, I am sorry if this offends, avoid yesterday-cuddling trade unionisation of who does which, when, at what fixed price, and traditionally how. In our lifetime, it has been proven (a) that free markets bring forth those three qualities circa six times more efficaciously than when politicians say "let's appoint a monopoly organisation to produce some bright wheeze like a channel tunnel", ooh; and proven (b) that international institutions and politicians (of all parties) fib incredibly about the statistical results of this.


When Brussels said that communist East Germany had surpassed Harold Wilson's Britain in prosperity, and Ted Heath and a credulous BBC trilled agreement, I went to East Germany. Anybody who noticed a Trabant was not worth a Mercedes, could see East Germany outproduced even Wilson's Britain only in pollution and steroid-drugged lady shot-putters. In its most showpiece factories I assessed productivity at some one-sixth of Wilson's Britain's factories per man and per almost every other unit of input. When the Berlin Wall came down, my assessment proved to have been a little too kind to socialism as usual. If you compared the state factories of North Korea with the private factories of South Korea, you'd get the more dramatic figures typical of Asia. In the early 1990s the nationalised telephone utility of India had 40 times more employees than the privatised telephone utility of Thailand, although little Thailand was then just passing mighty India in the number of telephones actually working.


In Europe, we have the usual figures which might seem rude to the right honourable ex-member of Ebbw Vale. In the dozen years since British steel was privatised, its productivity per man has risen six times. If he says this is because of wicked sackings and shuttings, remember that Oxford's Attlee in 1947 told Britain's then 367,000 coalminers that coming public ownership would ensure nobody producing such valuable stuff as coal would lose his job this century. It is only the long overdue privatisation that can save even 12,000 of those jobs now, but don't let me claw at scabs of old wounds.


The question for your generation, sir, is whether you are going to drive ever more underclass Britons into unemployment by allowing five vital industries (accounting for three quarters of public expenditure) to be run by politicians at circa one sixth the efficiency that freer markets would bring. These are (1) social security insurance; (2) education; (3) health insurance; (4) a regulatory bureaucracy now five times larger than in Kaiser Wilhelm's Prussia; (5) crime non-prevention.


In education you will have to move to competitive vouchers, with payments highest for those who set up competitive schools in the worst inner cities, where state teaching of both facts and behaviour has incredibly declined in the past 50 years, while private industry has spread once unimaginable durables like colour tvs from 0 to 98% of households. One part of education (assessing by computer a particular child's learning pattern, seizing from that the next questions or facts to impart) will become telecommunicable from far countries. Bovine politicians don't see the same is true of social security insurance (if clients choose to stick to behaviourial norms like staying in married families, you can insure them and theirs far more cheaply against most social ills), and in health insurance (where doctors from Singapore will diagnose the right medical and diet regimes for the tummy from Wigan just X-rayed down their screens). The world's greatest experts on these three and other telecommutable subjects will congregate in the lands with lowest taxation, and all of you voting against tonight's motion will just be brutalising, ruining and killing poorer people if you say that's jolly unfair to British politicians' monopoly welfare state.


Crime rates will depend on whether you elect over-arrogant politicians. In the first decade of my life America produced gangsterdom as well as boom, because its politicians (in a folly my dad said would never be repeated) decreed alcohol could only be sold by Capone's vicious criminals. In this last decade of my life two-thirds of British crime is drug-related, because politicians decree sales of other drugs must be profitably reserved only for criminals. Under any sensible tax plus licensing regime such as we now have for alcohol, you don't get 15-year olds hooked on a wild and muggery-necessitating £200 a day alcohol mania, because a pub, fearing a loss of licence, would refer any such client for special treatment. In crime prevention we will also have to move to the methods of Japan, which has one seventh as many lawyers as we, a court system based on "did he do it, and how most cheaply to stop him doing it again?" which does not include stuffing hordes into expensive British prisons which statistically make inmates more likely to reoffend.


Can you see any other trade apart from heavily trade unionised British prison screws who have actual negative gross production? Yes, a few feet away. A chart from that Swedish Royal Commission chaired by the profs who award the Nobel prize in economics showed that the most effective number of members of parliament for a country of Britain's size would be 90-something. We have 651, and for the imminent general election they have pushed it up to 659 jobs for the boys.


I'd like to end on a more kindly note. If I'd been told in youth that politicians would spend 42% of Britain's GDP, which is more than Hitler spent of Germany's GDP in 1937, I'd have assumed we would by now be living under a monstrous tyranny. After 50 years of reporting on parliament, let me end with my favourite story which shows it just as an elephant's joke. The story is denied by the two self-credulous politicians concerned, but confirmed by the Americans who observed it. One day in the mid-80s, a party of American tourists was as usual being shown reverently around the palace of Westminster. The Lord Chancellor of England appeared in full gig on a staircase above them, and he needed to talk, on some matter of altering a timetable, to the Right Hon gent's successor as Labour leader who was disappearing down a corridor the other way. so Lord Chancellor Hailsham, in full-bottomed wig and black and gold robe, called to the other by his Christian name. Over the heads of the American tourists, he bellowed "Neil".


Instantly, and without hesitation, all the American tourists in the middle fell fully to their knees. A similar obsequiousness is not required to all the forecasts I have shouted at you this evening. A small genuflection will suffice to the simple rule by which your generation could octuple Britain's real national income during the 40 years of marvellously increasing computer technology which will be your working lives. That rule, sir, is never, never, allow politicians to pinch and spend more than a quarter of GDP. Everything will be so easy for the poorest of your contemporaries if only you understand that."

Source:

Growth depends on never letting politicians spend more than one quarter of GDP

Oxford Union Debate of 30 May 1996



For the motion : Norman Macrae (CBE and Japanese Order of the Rising Sun), economist, market futurologist, writer of over 2000 editorials, mainly retired after 5 decades of journalism at The Economist and The Sunday Times

Against the motion: Rt Honourable Michael Foot, UK Member of Parliament for Plymouth (1945-1955), Ebbw Vale (1960-1983), Leader of the Labour Party (1980-1983) and succeeded by Rt Hon Neil Kinnock (1983-1992)
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xxafrica's largest company the tech network naspers has invested in south african the student hub which aims to put afr9icamn college edu on line- see davos agenda 2021

IS THIS DEC 2020 THE BEST NEWS THE UNITED NATIONS HAS EVER SHARED WITH PARENTS AND YOUTH:Background A world of hope and change with increasing complexity, uncertainty and fragility We live in a world of hope and change with increasing complexity, uncertainty, and fragility. The scale of climate change and its implications are worse than what had been imagined even five years ago when the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals were adopted. Persistent inequalities, social fragmentation, and political extremism continue to undermine social cohesion. Advances in digital communications, artificial intelligence, and biotechnology are fundamentally transforming the way we live, work, communicate, process knowledge and learn. While these technological disruptions hold great promise for improving human welfare, they also raise ethical, social and legal concerns. The economic and social disruption caused by the COVID-19 pandemic has further heightened this complexity, uncertainty, and fragility. The disruption resulting from the pandemic has exposed the vulnerabilities of our societies and our education systems and is further exacerbating the pre-existing learning crisis. Although all countries have adopted some modality of remote learning in their national education response in the form of online platforms, TV and radio programmes and take-home packages, the coverage has been extremely uneven and millions of learners have been left without any continuity of learning. Recentsurvey data clearly indicatesthatlearning loss has been more acute in low- and lowerInternational Forum AI and the Futures of Education Developing Competencies for the AI Era 7-8 December 2020 © Metamorworks/Shutterstock.com Concept Note 2 International Forum on AI and the Futures of Education middle-income countries than in high-income countries (UNESCO, UNICEF and the World Bank October 2020). Disengagement and the risk of drop out is highest for the most vulnerable, with the number of children out of school likely to increase by at least 24 million as a result of the pandemic. In response, UNESCO has taken a holistic approach to strengthening international cooperation to support Member States to enhance distance learning solutions, support the safe reopening of schools and to reimagine more resilient learning systems for the future. The Futures of Education initiative The current crisis also highlights the urgency of charting the possible futures of education. Recognizing that knowledge and learning are humanity’s greatest renewable resources for responding to challenges and inventing alternatives, UNESCO launched a Futures of Education Initiative in late 2019 before the outbreak of the Covid-19 pandemic. The Initiative aims to rethink the role of education, learning and knowledge in light of the tremendous challenges and opportunities of futures. Such re-visioning of knowledge, education and learning is more relevant than ever. Indeed, accelerated technology transformations over recent years, in particular in the field of Artificial Intelligence (AI), and their rapid deployment in work, life and learning have profound implications for the future of education. AI is largely believed to hold transformative powers in reshaping human society and life, and will likely bring human history to a new era where we need to live and work together with AI. These transformations represent both challenges and opportunities that need to be carefully examined. The Beijing Consensus on Artificial Intelligence and Education To support education policy and planning in the era of AI, UNESCO, the Ministry of Education of the People’s Republic of China, and the National Commission of the People’s Republic of China for UNESCO co-organized the first International Conference on AI and Education (Beijing, May 2019). The conference resulted in the first international consensus on AI and education, the Beijing Consensus. Through the Beijing Consensus, guiding principles and concrete recommendations were provided in response to three fundamental questions: (1) How can education systems ensure the ethical, inclusive and equitable use of AI in education? (2) How can education prepare humans to live and work with AI? (3) How can AI be leveraged to enhance or reinvent education? The Beijing Consensus recognizes the distinctive features of human intelligence. It reaffirms UNESCO’s humanistic and ethical approach to the use of AI with a view to protecting human rights and preparing all people with the appropriate competencies(knowledge,skills and values) needed for effective human– machine collaboration in life, learning and work, and forsustainable development. The Beijing Consensus affirms that while AI provides opportunities to support teachers in their educational and pedagogical responsibilities, human interaction and collaboration between teachers and learners must remain at the core of the educational process. It reaffirms that teachers cannot be displaced by machines. While we should be cognizant of trendsregarding the potential of AI to support and transform learning and learning assessments, it is important to note that evidence on the impact of AI in improving learning outcomes of subject-specific learning and the development of interdisciplinary competencies remains scarce. Curriculum review to promote the in-depth integration of AI and transformation of learning and the Concept Note 3 International Forum on AI and the Futures of Education development of AI tools for education should be centred on teachers and students. The deployment of AI in classrooms and beyond should be in the service of people to enhance human capacities. The Beijing Consensusrecommendsthat governments and otherstakeholders among UNESCO’s Member States consider implementing system-wide actions in response to the education-related opportunities and challenges presented by AI. More specifically, it highlights the emergence of a set of AI literacy skills required for effective human–machine collaboration atthe AI era. One and a half years afterthe adoption of the Beijing Consensus and during the aftermath of the COVID-19 education disruption, it is imperative to examine what institutional actions have been taken in defining the competencies needed for the AI era, and how future education systems can develop them as an integral part or core sets of skills for all. Aim It is in this context that UNESCO, the Ministry of Education of the People’s Republic of China, and the National Commission of the People’s Republic of China for UNESCO will co-organize an online edition of the International Forum on Artificial Intelligence and the Futures of Education from 7 to 8 December 2020 under the theme Developing Competencies for the AI Era. The Forum will follow up on the implementation of the Beijing Consensus. The Beijing Consensus recommends that UNESCO reinforce the leading role of AI in education across concerned sectors and mobilize the Organization’s institutes and networks with a specific focus on the integration of AI skills into ICT competency frameworks. It also recommends UNESCO to further expand its cooperation in the field of AI in education with relevant partners. Devoted to the theme of Developing Competencies for the AI Era, the online Forum will share policies and practices in defining the competencies required in the AI era, and examine the strategies to prepare all people to live and work with AI effectively. Subthemes The Forum will be structured under the following sub-themes: 1. The future of education in light of challenges and opportunities of AI – Convene a debate on how AI will shape the future of humanity and education, and review the implications of AI for the inclusion, equity, and quality of learning. 2. Core competencies required for living and working with AI – Anticipate the competencies required for living and working effectively with AI, define AI skill frameworks with a focus on K12 schools, share best practices in developing AI curricula and teaching resources as well as in preparing teachers to teach AI. 3. Curriculum development in the AI era - Focus on the transformation of curriculum and textbooks in all disciplines at all levels to meet the needs of students’ key competencies development in the AI era. Concept Note 4 International Forum on AI and the Futures of Education 4. Ethical and effective use of AI in learning and teaching – Share evidence-informed effective models of using AI in learning and teaching, reveal ethical issues and share coping strategies. Target Participants The Forum mainly targets invited participants. It is expecting around 200 participants with about 100 international representatives. The participants will include Ministers of Education and/or ICT, senior policy-makers, experts from international organizations, representatives of private sector partners and civil society organizations, prominent academic researchers, and managers of selected AI in education projects. Co-organizers The Forum is co-organized by: • United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization • Ministry of Education of the People’s Republic of China • National Commission of the People’s Republic of China for UNESCO The following institutes provide support in hosting the Forum: • UNESCO International Bureau of Education • UNESCO Institute for Information Technologies in Education • Beijing Normal University Financial support has been provided by: • The Tomorrow Advancing Life Education Group • The WeiDong Education Cloud Working Languages Interpretation services will be provided in English, French and Chinese. Concept Note 5 International Forum on AI and the Futures of Education Provisional Programme Structure [China Standard Time (CST), UTC+8] Day 1 (7 December) Day 2 (8 December) 17:00-18:30 Opening Session and High-level Panel 1 Sign in 15:00-16:30 Special Session Consultation on the Futures of Education Sign in 16:30-17:00 Break 17:00-18:30 Parallel Session 1 Curriculum and textbooks in the AI era Sign in Parallel Session 2 Effective and ethical use of AI in learning and teaching Sign in Parallel Session 3 Supporting African countries’ education development for the coming AI Era Sign in 18:30-18:40 Break 18:30-18:40 Break 18:40-20:10 Plenary Session Defining and developing AI competencies in the context of the futures of education Sign in 18:40-19:50 High-level Panel 2 Empowering Women and Youth Sign in 20:10-20:40 Plenary Session (continued without interpretation) Defining and developing AI competencies in the context of the futures of education Sign in 19:50-20:10 Closing Session Sign in High-level Panel 1 is scheduled back to back with the Opening Session, and presents speeches of ministers of education on national strategies for promoting the use of AI to enhance education and to build the futures of learning. Plenary Session convenes discussions on how AI will shape the future of humanity and education, and review the implications of AI to reimagine knowledge and education guided by the principle of inclusion and equity in access to quality learning opportunities, and is composed of experts in the field of AI skills Concept Note 6 International Forum on AI and the Futures of Education development to allow participants from around the world to share experiences, demonstrate innovative examples, and plan joint actions in defining the competencies required by living, working and learning with AI. The Special Session will invite Chinese scholars, policy-makers and educators to share their perspectives on the Futures of Education in order to enrich the deliberations of the International Commission on this initiative. Parallel Session 1 aims to inspire participants to think deeply about the reconstruction of education systems, especially the development of curriculum and textbooks to unleash the potential of AI in developing human competencies in a changing context. Parallel Session 2 promotes the ethical application of trusted AI technology for education, and the sharing of evidence-informed effective practices in using AI in learning, teaching, monitoring and evaluation, and management of education. It also aims to examine ethical issues related to the use of AI in different learning settings and reviews effective mitigation strategies. Parallel Session 3 focuses on supporting African countries in the development of strategic foresight and operational capacities in response to the emerging challenges and opportunities of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, with a focus on teaching and leveraging AI to enhance education. It is guided by the principle that the new technologies should be leveraged, through South-South dialogue and cooperation, to accelerate the development of education in Africa and ensure that the continent benefit from the AI era together with the other regions. The session will also serve as a follow-up action to other initiatives set out within the framework of UNESCO’s Global Priority Africa, in particular (1) the 2018 Benguerir Outcome Statement adopted at UNESCO’s First Forum on Artificial Intelligence in Africa; and (2) the UNESCO/OCP Foundation Project entitled Imagining Africa’s Futures, which aims at developing foresight skills in Africa among young talents and high-level decision makers to contribute more effectively to positive social transformations on the continent, including in areas such as education and AI. High-level Panel 2 will present possible ways forward for key international partners on promoting equitable and ethical use of AI in education with a focus on gender equality in designing and using AI, and share strategies for developing AI competencies for women and youth. Technical specifications The event uses Zoom applications to support the live sessions, and use an online conferencing website to support the registration, the update of live sessions, and networking among participants. Live streaming platforms will be used to expand real-time participation. Concept Note 7 International Forum on AI and the Futures of Education Stay in touch aied@unesco.org; literacy@moe.edu.cn https://on.unesco.org/AIEDforum2020 @UNESCOICTs @UNESCO @UNESCOICTinEducation @UNESCO
.education's 7 ways to misvalue youth
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back in 2015 nations committed to uniting around sustainability goals - the greatest collaboration race ever
poverty tedx and

After 25 years as one of the west's3 great living servant public and global health, JIm Kim's inaugural year at world bank saw the creation of curriculum #2030now demanding young professionals transform any systemic non-sustainable monopolies embedded in
old professions of global 1.0; by year end pope francis and jim kim were announcing the count on me partnership

HAPPY 2015 Jim Kim2030nowjimkim2transcripts.doc 2030nowjimkim2transcripts.doc,


how did so many nations media and political egos drop the ball

students of the class of 2020 have a right to ask a lot better from elders - not just because sports have seen their finals abandoned - we have not been uniting medicine -and professions - beyond borders -to prevent risks, we haven't used online education to app live critical knowhow across communities,
Astronaut Ron Garan poses massive collaboration challenge

we are decade or more off course from 1984 timelines if we wanted millennials to be the first sdg generation

educators & economists & parents who havent read what adam smith said about the empire's education systems can't help youth be the sustainability generation- here are 7 biggest ways education misvalues youth's need to be the futures parents want
.
*missing curricula -eg coding, entrepreneurial literacy -source mandela extranet
*missing loveq = source jack ma
*missing celebrations of youth- source value chains such as sports, arts, pop stars
*missing cooperation spaces/hubs to apprentice at renewing community or integrating hi-trust networks in cities and villages and at borders- sources include most usa inner cities
*missing cultural translation dynamics especially as applied to either the disadvantaged or the super-intellects
*missing economic valuation of both youth and motherhood which makes societies value women 10 times less than men- *sources include most women we have interviewed
*missing timing at each revolution in tech or media- sources include last 33 years of valuing every youth as lifelong teacher and student


3 & Russia (N and NW of China where most old world land & ice is)
4 , 5 east and west euro
6 Americas N
7 Mid East aka W Asia and Stans
8 Med sea belt nations across old world 3 continents
9 Africa
10 Latin Am
11 Arctic Circle

























https://aiedforum.org/#/home wow have you seen: International Forum on AI
and the Futures of Education
Developing Competencies for the AI Era

"First, the development of online education contributes to the promotion of fairer and better-quality education," Bai said that at the beginning of the year, the COVID-19 outbreak left more than 1.4 billion students and youths around the world facing the interruption of education. As a response, TAL Education Group quickly launched online public welfare free classes, sending the whole subject and a large number of quality-oriented education courses to thousands of households through online live broadcast technology, with more than 60 million daily hits on the live stream lessons.

Meanwhile, TAL Education Group also completed the free deployment of the live broadcast teaching system for 595 public schools, benefiting more than 30,000 teachers, he added.

A research of the Education Research Institute of TAL Education Group and the Beijing Normal University has showed that online education could make up for the scarcity of educational resources in underdeveloped areas and effectively promote educational fairness, said the chairman.

He added that through the cooperation with China Foundation for Poverty Alleviation and the "Xiwang.com" platform for public welfare educational resources, TAL Education Group has delivered teaching resources to remote mountainous areas in the scarcity of educational resources.

"At present, 40 counties and districts in 18 provinces have been covered, benefiting more than 100,000 teachers and students."

In Sichuan Province's Liangshan Yi Autonomous Prefecture, TAL Education Group customized Yi-Mandarin bilingual learning module for preschool children, said Bai. "It integrates speech recognition, semantic evaluation and other technologies and loved by children."

He added that United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) awarded the Certificate for the 2020 Demonstration Project on AI and Inclusive Innovation to the Project, recognizing the contribution of the project to the protection of minority languages and the promotion of fairness and inclusion.

Also on Monday, UNESCO Assistant Director-General for Education Stefania Giannini signed a strategic cooperation agreement with Wan Yiting, Executive President of TAL Education Group. The two parties will establish Internet and AI-based online study systems that are capable of withstanding crises on a global scale.

"Second, the development of AI is promoting the educational reform and innovation, with the future prospect turning up," Bai saidan Ministers of Education Organization (SEAMEO) Secretariat
Thailand

UNESCO SUMMIT EDUCATION AI PARTNERS


Co-organizers CHINA MIN ED UNESCO CHINA UNESCO
Supporters BEIJING NORMAL UNESCO EDTECH INTL BUREAU OF EDU
Financial Supporters TAL WDECLOUD
SPEAKERS Ms Stefania Giannini Assistant Director-General for Education UNESCO H.E. Mr Agapito Mba Mokuy Chairperson of the Executive Board UNESCO Mr Firmin Matoko Assistant Director-general, Africa Department UNESCO Ms Gabriela Ramos Assistant Director-General for Social and Human Sciences UNESCO H.E. Mr CHEN Baosheng Minister of Education People’s Republic of China Mr Chen Qun Vice Mayor of Shanghai Municipal People's Government China Ms Simona Kustec Minister of Education, Science and Sport Slovenia Mr Saaid Amzazi Minister of National Education, Vocational Training, Higher Education and Scientific Research Morocco Mr Hussein bin Ibrahim Al HammadiMinister of EducationThe United Arab Emirates H.E Dr. Ibrahim Bin Saleh Al-Naimi Undersecretary of the Ministry of Education and Higher Education Qatar H.E. Mr Gabriel Changson Chang Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology South Sudan H.E. Mr TIAN Xuejun Vice Minister of Education Chairperson of Chinese National Commission for UNESCO People’s Republic of China H.E. Mr ZHENG FuzhiVice Minister of Education People’s Republic of China Mr Dong Qi President of Beijing Normal University China Mr Vincent Adul Ministry of ICT, Innovation and Youth Affairs Kenya H.E. Dr. Engineer Getahun Mekuria Minister of Education Ethiopia Ms Ivana Franić State Secretary, Ministry of Science and Education Croatia H.E. Mr Sann Vathana Under Secretary of State Ministry of Education, Youth and Sport Cambodia Mr Yang Jin Ambassador and Permanent Delegate of the People's Republic of China to UNESCO H.E. Mr Nasser Al-Aqeeli Deputy Minister for research and innovation, Ministry of Education of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabia Mr LEI Chaozi Director-General, Department for Science and Technology Ministry of Education China Mr Anass Bennani Director of Cooperation and Partnership at the Ministry of National Education, Vocational Training, Higher Education and Scientific Research. Morocco Mr QIN Changwei Secretary General, National Commission of China for UNESCO Mr N'golo Soro Secretary-General National Commission of Cote d’Ivoire for UNESCO Cote d’Ivoire Mr Bai Yunfeng Co-Founder, Chairman of Board of Directors and President TAL Education Group Mr Sobhi Tawil Director, Future of Learning and Innovation UNESCO Mr DU Yue Director, Priority Africa Coordination Division UNESCO Mr Yao Ydo Director, a.i. UNESCO International Bureau of Education (IBE-UNESCO) Ms Inge Molenaar Assistant professor Behavioural Science Institute at Radboud University Netherlands Ms Juliet Waters Chief Knowledge Officer Kids Code Jeunesse Mr Wayne Holmes Former Principal Researcher (Education) Nesta United Kingdom Mr John Shawe-Taylor Professor of Computational Statistics and Machine Learning University College London United Kingdom Mr ZHAN Tao Director Institute for Information Technologies in Education, UNESCO Mr MIAO Fengchun Chief, Unit for Technology and AI in Education UNESCO Mr HUANG Ronghuai Co-Dean Smart Learning Institute of Beijing Normal University China Ms Trine Jensen Technology and Higher Education International Association of Universities (IAU) Mr Isak Froumin Director, Institute of Education National Research University, Higher School of Economics Russia Ms Bridget Bannerman Multidisciplinary research scientist and a Director of Studies in Chemistry Cavendish College, University of Cambridge Sierra Leone Mr Marco Antonio Martínez Pérez Kumoontun Mexico Mr Abdoulaye Ibrahim Chief, Contextual Analysis and Foresight Unit, Priority Africa and External Relations Sector UNESCO Mr Renato Opertti Senior Curriculum Specialist IBE-UNESCO Mr Philippe Jonnaert BACSE International – Bureau d’appui curriculaire aux systèmes éducatifs Canada Mr Aliou Sow Education / Textbooks specialist Guinea Ms Mariana Montaldo Plan Ceibal Uruguay Mr Venkataraman Balaji Vice President Commonwealth of Learning Mr Jeremy Roschelle Executive Director, Learning Sciences Digital Promise USA Mr Chen Yunlong Vice Director National Institute for Curriculum and Textbook Research, Ministry of Education China Ms Toyosi Akerele-Ogunsiji Social Entrepreneur in Data Science and Artificial Intelligence Education Nigeria Ms Raïssa Malu Director Investing in People D.R. Congo Mr Emiliano Pereiro Plan Ceibal Uruguay Mr Yunhuo Cui Professor, Institute of Curriculum and Instruction East China Normal University China Mr Luis Junqueira Co-founder Letrus Brazil Mr LIN Yifu Honorary Dean, National School of Development Peking University China Ms JIANG Xiaojuan Dean, School of Public Policy and Management Tsinghua University China Mr ZHU Yongxin Vice President, the Central Committee of the China Association for Promoting Democracy Mr GONG Ke Executive Director, Chinese Institute of New Generation Artificial Intelligence Development Strategies (President of World Federation of Engineering Organizations) Mr LIU Changya Director General, Department of Development and Planning Ministry of Education of the People’s Republic of China China Mr REN Youqun Director General, Department of Teacher Education Ministry of Education of the People’s Republic of China China Mr LIU Yuhui Director General Beijing Municipal Education Commission China Mr LIU Qingfeng Chairman and President iFLYTEK China Mr CHEN Feng Director General National Center for Schooling Development Programme Mr YANG Zongkai President XIDIAN University China Mr YANG Xinbin President SHENZHEN Polytechnic China Mr LI Xiaohui Principal The Experimental High School Attached to Beijing Normal University Ms LU Yongli Principal Beijing No.2 Experimental Primary School Ms LI Zhisheng Ph.D. Student, Faculty of Education Beijing Normal University Mr Philippe Durance Senior Consultant, Priority Africa and External Relations Sector, UNESCO, and Professor and Chair of Foresight and Sustainable Development, Conservatoire national des arts et métiers (CNAM) France Mr Hicham El Habti President Mohammed VI Polytechnic University Morocco Mr Oluwatoyin Ogundipe Vice Chancellor University of Lagos Nigeria Ms Marie Luce Akossiwoa Quashie Mensah Attoh, General Secretary University of Lomé Togo Mr LI Ming Director-General UNESCO International Centre for Higher Education Innovation (ICHEI) Mr Diego Golombek Executive Director The National Institute of Technological Education (INET) Argentina Ms Phyllis Kandie Ambassador and Permanent Delegate of the Republic of Kenya to UNESCO and Chairperson of the Africa Group Mr Ignace Gatare Principal of the College of Science and Technology University of Rwanda Rwanda Ms Dorothy Gordon Chair of the Intergovernmental Council for the Information for All Programme UNESCO Mr Ki-Sang Song Professor of Korea National University of Education, Dean of Graduate School of Korea National University of Education Mr Wang Duanrui Chairman Weidong Cloud Education Group China Mr Ivan Karlov Head of the Laboratory for Digital Transformation of Education Russia Ms Iaroslava Kharkova Associate Project Officer, Unit for Technology and AI in Education UNESCO Ms Michela Pagano Associate Project Officer, Unit for Technology and AI in Education UNESCO Ms Maïmouna Sissoko-Touré Program specialist Institut de la Francophonie pour l’éducation et la formation Sénégal Ms Ethel Agnes Pascua-Valenzuela Director Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization (SEAMEO) Secretariat Thailand......

On July 28, the "2020 China High-growth Enterprise Development Forum& China Unicorn Enterprise Research Report Release Conference" was held in Tianjin, and Weidong Cloud Education Group was once again selected as the "Chinese Unicorn Enterprise".


Photo: Weidong Cloud Education was selected as the "2019 China Unicorn Enterprises" list

Global Education Layout of "One Body and Two Wings"

Innovation is the soul of a nation’s progress, and education is the cornerstone of social progress. Everyone has the right to equitably enjoy education, and "sharing educational resources and inheriting human civilization" is the unique corporate sentiment of Weidong Cloud Education. Since its inception, Weidong Cloud Education has been advancing towards its position as a “Global Internet Education Platform Operator”, and strives to build a lifelong education ecosystem that benefits the world by creating a global education layout of “one body and two wings”.

At present, Weidong Cloud Education relies on its unique position in the field of international Internet education, using domestic high-quality education platform applications as the "main body" to build an open PaaS cloud platform. With the "Europe and America + Asia and Africa" dual route pattern as the "two wings" to comprehensively promote the internationalization strategy.

In China, on the one hand, Weidong Cloud Education strives to build a middleground education field that meets the national conditions. With the help of international resource advantages, the coordinated development at home and abroad provides the country with high-end talents and a large number of employment opportunities. Business cover 24 provinces and 169 cities in urban areas and counties. On the other hand, Weidong Cloud Education will make full use of Qingdao International Vocational Education City built by the group to build an "Artificial Intelligence + Internet Education + Education Equipment Manufacturing" 100 billion-level industrial cluster, and strive to build a vocational education innovation development demonstration zone and vocational education institution gathering area, industry-education integration pioneer area, and "Belt and Road" international vocational education platform.

In the direction of Europe and the United States, Weidong Cloud Education gives priority to the output of education content, provides training services for the world's top 500 enterprises through the acquisition of demos, the second largest vocational education and training group in Europe. It also provides high-quality resources for the development of domestic higher education through the acquisition of Brest business school in France. In the direction of Asia and Africa, Weidong Cloud Education prioritizes the layout of the education market. Through cooperation with the UNESCO ICHEI, it has successively deployed “Weidong Smart Classroom” in Pakistan, Cambodia, Egypt, Djibouti and other countries along the “Belt and Road” to provide local universities with smart teaching tools and distance learning platforms. Through cooperation with the UNESCO IITE, both sides will jointly promote the construction of "Future Schools" in six countries: Mauritius, Namibia, Nigeria, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, and Kyrgyzstan.

Unique advantages in international society resources


Weidong Cloud Education has a strong international social resource advantage. It has signed strategic cooperation with UNESCO and Shanghai Cooperation Organization respectively, and has extensive cooperation with relevant member countries in the fields of education, culture, science and technology. In March 2020, as the only Chinese internet education company, Weidong has co-sponsored the establishment of the "Global Education Alliance" with international leading companies such as Microsoft, Google, Amazon, Facebook, Zoom, etc., to provide internet education platform services to countries around the world and improve education gaps between countries and regions to build a global lifelong education ecology.

SPEAKERS Ms Stefania Giannini
Assistant Director-General for Education
UNESCO
H.E. Mr Agapito Mba Mokuy
Chairperson of the Executive Board
UNESCO
Mr Firmin Matoko
Assistant Director-general, Africa Department
UNESCO
Ms Gabriela Ramos
Assistant Director-General for Social and Human Sciences
UNESCO
H.E. Mr CHEN Baosheng
Minister of Education
People’s Republic of China
Mr Chen Qun
Vice Mayor of Shanghai Municipal People's Government
China
Ms Simona Kustec
Minister of Education, Science and Sport
Slovenia
Mr Saaid Amzazi
Minister of National Education, Vocational Training, Higher Education and Scientific Research
Morocco
Mr Hussein bin Ibrahim Al HammadiMinister of EducationThe United Arab Emirates
H.E Dr. Ibrahim Bin Saleh Al-Naimi
Undersecretary of the Ministry of Education and Higher Education
Qatar
H.E. Mr Gabriel Changson Chang
Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology
South Sudan
H.E. Mr TIAN Xuejun
Vice Minister of Education Chairperson of Chinese National Commission for UNESCO
People’s Republic of China
H.E. Mr ZHENG FuzhiVice Minister of Education
People’s Republic of China
Mr Dong Qi
President of Beijing Normal University
China
Mr Vincent Adul
Ministry of ICT, Innovation and Youth Affairs
Kenya
H.E. Dr. Engineer Getahun Mekuria
Minister of Education
Ethiopia
Ms Ivana Franić
State Secretary, Ministry of Science and Education
Croatia
H.E. Mr Sann Vathana
Under Secretary of State
Ministry of Education, Youth and Sport
Cambodia
Mr Yang Jin
Ambassador and Permanent Delegate of the People's Republic of China to UNESCO
H.E. Mr Nasser Al-Aqeeli
Deputy Minister for research and innovation, Ministry of Education of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Saudi Arabia
Mr LEI Chaozi
Director-General, Department for Science and Technology
Ministry of Education
China
Mr Anass Bennani
Director of Cooperation and Partnership at the Ministry of National Education, Vocational Training, Higher Education and Scientific Research.
Morocco
Mr QIN Changwei
Secretary General, National Commission of China for UNESCO
Mr N'golo Soro
Secretary-General
National Commission of Cote d’Ivoire for UNESCO
Cote d’Ivoire
Mr Bai Yunfeng
Co-Founder, Chairman of Board of Directors and President
TAL Education Group
Mr Sobhi Tawil
Director, Future of Learning and Innovation
UNESCO
Mr DU Yue
Director, Priority Africa Coordination Division
UNESCO
Mr Yao Ydo
Director, a.i.
UNESCO International Bureau of Education (IBE-UNESCO)
Ms Inge Molenaar
Assistant professor
Behavioural Science Institute at Radboud University
Netherlands
Ms Juliet Waters
Chief Knowledge Officer
Kids Code Jeunesse
Mr Wayne Holmes
Former Principal Researcher (Education)
Nesta
United Kingdom
Mr John Shawe-Taylor
Professor of Computational Statistics and Machine Learning
University College London
United Kingdom
Mr ZHAN Tao
Director
Institute for Information Technologies in Education, UNESCO
Mr MIAO Fengchun
Chief, Unit for Technology and AI in Education
UNESCO
Mr HUANG Ronghuai
Co-Dean
Smart Learning Institute of Beijing Normal University
China
Ms Trine Jensen
Technology and Higher Education
International Association of Universities (IAU)
Mr Isak Froumin
Director, Institute of Education
National Research University, Higher School of Economics
Russia
Ms Bridget Bannerman
Multidisciplinary research scientist and a Director of Studies in Chemistry
Cavendish College, University of Cambridge
Sierra Leone
Mr Marco Antonio Martínez Pérez
Kumoontun
Mexico
Mr Abdoulaye Ibrahim
Chief, Contextual Analysis and Foresight Unit, Priority Africa and External Relations Sector
UNESCO
Mr Renato Opertti
Senior Curriculum Specialist
IBE-UNESCO
Mr Philippe Jonnaert
BACSE International – Bureau d’appui curriculaire aux systèmes éducatifs
Canada
Mr Aliou Sow
Education / Textbooks specialist
Guinea
Ms Mariana Montaldo
Plan Ceibal
Uruguay
Mr Venkataraman Balaji
Vice President
Commonwealth of Learning
Mr Jeremy Roschelle
Executive Director, Learning Sciences
Digital Promise
USA
Mr Chen Yunlong
Vice Director
National Institute for Curriculum and Textbook Research, Ministry of Education
China
Ms Toyosi Akerele-Ogunsiji
Social Entrepreneur in Data Science and Artificial Intelligence Education
Nigeria
Ms Raïssa Malu
Director
Investing in People
D.R. Congo
Mr Emiliano Pereiro
Plan Ceibal
Uruguay
Mr Yunhuo Cui
Professor, Institute of Curriculum and Instruction
East China Normal University
China
Mr Luis Junqueira
Co-founder
Letrus
Brazil
Mr LIN Yifu
Honorary Dean, National School of Development
Peking University
China
Ms JIANG Xiaojuan
Dean, School of Public Policy and Management
Tsinghua University
China
Mr ZHU Yongxin
Vice President, the Central Committee of the China Association for Promoting Democracy
Mr GONG Ke
Executive Director, Chinese Institute of New Generation Artificial Intelligence Development Strategies (President of World Federation of Engineering Organizations)
Mr LIU Changya
Director General, Department of Development and Planning
Ministry of Education of the People’s Republic of China
China
Mr REN Youqun
Director General, Department of Teacher Education
Ministry of Education of the People’s Republic of China
China
Mr LIU Yuhui
Director General
Beijing Municipal Education Commission
China
Mr LIU Qingfeng
Chairman and President
iFLYTEK
China
Mr CHEN Feng
Director General
National Center for Schooling Development Programme
Mr YANG Zongkai
President
XIDIAN University
China
Mr YANG Xinbin
President
SHENZHEN Polytechnic
China
Mr LI Xiaohui
Principal
The Experimental High School Attached to Beijing Normal University
Ms LU Yongli
Principal
Beijing No.2 Experimental Primary School
Ms LI Zhisheng
Ph.D. Student, Faculty of Education
Beijing Normal University
Mr Philippe Durance
Senior Consultant, Priority Africa and External Relations Sector, UNESCO, and Professor and Chair of Foresight and Sustainable Development, Conservatoire national des arts et métiers (CNAM)
France
Mr Hicham El Habti
President
Mohammed VI Polytechnic University
Morocco
Mr Oluwatoyin Ogundipe
Vice Chancellor
University of Lagos
Nigeria
Ms Marie Luce Akossiwoa Quashie
Mensah Attoh, General Secretary
University of Lomé
Togo
Mr LI Ming
Director-General
UNESCO International Centre for Higher Education Innovation (ICHEI)
Mr Diego Golombek
Executive Director
The National Institute of Technological Education (INET)
Argentina
Ms Phyllis Kandie
Ambassador and Permanent Delegate of the Republic of Kenya to UNESCO and Chairperson of the Africa Group
Mr Ignace Gatare
Principal of the College of Science and Technology
University of Rwanda
Rwanda
Ms Dorothy Gordon
Chair of the Intergovernmental Council for the Information for All Programme
UNESCO
Mr Ki-Sang Song
Professor of Korea National University of Education, Dean of Graduate School of Korea National University of Education
Mr Wang Duanrui
Chairman
Weidong Cloud Education Group
China
Mr Ivan Karlov
Head of the Laboratory for Digital Transformation of Education
Russia
Ms Iaroslava Kharkova
Associate Project Officer, Unit for Technology and AI in Education
UNESCO
Ms Michela Pagano
Associate Project Officer, Unit for Technology and AI in Education
UNESCO
Ms Maïmouna Sissoko-Touré
Program specialist
Institut de la Francophonie pour l’éducation et la formation
Sénégal
Ms Ethel Agnes Pascua-Valenzuela
Director
Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization (SEAMEO) Secretariat
Thailand

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